How Much Does a Doberman Pinscher Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 8, 2018

The Doberman Pinscher was developed in Germany in the last 19th century as a guard dog.  This breed is known for its cropped ears, docked tail, athletic build and sleek coat.

down/stay by pato_garza, on Flickr
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How much does a Doberman Pinscher cost?

The price of a Doberman Pinscher will depend on the dog’s age, quality, lineage and who you purchase it from.  On average, puppies can cost anywhere from as little as $600 to more than $1,300.  However, if the dog came from a champion bloodline, then the costs could be closer to $2,000 for a show quality pup.  European lines, if you’re able to find breeders in America, can often ask for prices higher than $3,000+

For those checking shelters, older dogs can be purchased for as little as $100 to $200.

On PuppyFind.com, a popular online dog classified website, had about 550 listings at the time of this writing, with prices ranging anywhere from $700 to $1,300.

Forum members on Doberman Talk talked about what they had paid for their puppies and most who replied said they paid anywhere from $1,650 to $2,500 from a high-quality puppy with title working parents and all health clearances.

At the official AKC Marketplace, most of the breeders who listing the prices were asking anywhere from $950 to $2,200.  These breeders included everything from a full health testing to OFA certifications, cropped ears and a microchip.

What is going to be included in the adoption fee?

Any reputable breeder should include up-to-date vaccinations, a veterinarian exam, registration paperwork, a health guarantee, written contract, and if being shipped, a travel crate as well.  Higher-end breeders may include the ear cropping, tail docking and dew claw removal.  Health testing should also be done, which should include, at a minimum, testing for hip dysplasia, von Willebrand’s disease, thyroid disease, a heart screening and genetic eye disease.

What are the extra costs?

Aside from the obvious adoption costs, there’s much more to consider in the future such as dog food, toys, supplies, a crate, training classes, dental bills and vet checkups/emergencies.  A healthy dog can easily cost more than $500 per year, and one that’s sick or comes down with an unnecessary surgery could cost much more than this.

Neutering or a spaying needs to be considered if your breeder didn’t include it.  The same can be said about a microchip if you were to want one.

If the dog will be shipped via the air or ground, plan on spending anywhere from $250 to $400, depending on the distance.  Some breeders, if specified, may include the shipping with the adoption fee.

Ear cropping, if it isn’t included with the adoption, can cost $400 to as much as $1,200, depending on the vet.

Obedience training classes, even though the dog is highly trainable, should be considered at a younger age to teach it the basics of sit, stay and lie down.

Tips to know

Its personality is said to be fearless, alert, loyal and very trainable.

Males, on average, can measure 26 to 28 inches tall, whereas a female will measure slightly smaller at 24 to 26 inches.  The same can be said with their weight, with a male weighing 75 to 100 pounds, while a female can weigh 60 to 90 pounds.

When healthy, the average lifespan is 10 to 12 years.

How can I save money?

Highly consider adopting and rescuing an older dog at a local shelter.  Since these dogs are pretty common, you may be able to find one or even place yourself on a waiting list.  Adopting is a great way to support the organization and help a dog find a forever home.  The DPCA.org and DPCarescue.com are both great websites that can help you find a dog in your area that is up for adoption.

If you’re certain you want to buy a puppy, be wary of the price.  If you find a price that’s too good to be true, you could wind up paying even more in the long haul due to the dog’s poor health.  A cheap Doberman, often found via a backyard breeder, won’t place priority on breeding a healthy dog; instead, their focus is on breeding as many dogs as possible for profit.  These breeders won’t screen for health problems, temperament issues and sometimes, you may not even receive a health guarantee.  When in doubt, always either consider adoption and bypass any breeder looking for cash or highly consider checking references and ensuring you’re getting a well-written contract that protects your investment.


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