How Much Does It Cost to Fill a Pool?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 8, 2018

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Although having a pool in your yard may be appealing to some, others find it a hassle.  Not only is it a huge job to take care of and maintain a pool, it can also be expensive and take up a lot of space in your yard.  Plus, if it needs a lot of repairs, it may be best to scrap it and use the space for a deck instead.

Those who have a pool and no longer want it have the option of getting it filled in. An inground pool will need to have the concrete removed, any patio or fencing torn up, and a large hole filled in with dirt and leveled.  Although some of this work can be done by the homeowner, professionals will be needed to do the majority of the work.

An inground pool will need to have the concrete removed, any patio or fencing torn up, and a large hole filled in with dirt and leveled.  Although some of this work can be done by the homeowner, professionals will be needed to do the majority of the work.

pool by JonoTakesPhotos, on Flickr
pool” (CC BY 2.0) by JonoTakesPhotos

How much does it cost to fill a pool?

The cost of filling in an in-ground pool is going to greatly vary depending on the size, the setup, and the geographical area.  On average, the typical backyard inground pool can vary anywhere from $4,000 to as much as $15,000.

According to PoolPricer.com, the cost will depend on the size of the pool, the path to the pool for the contractors, the type of pool removal, and if there are any types of special requirements that need to be done.  They say don’t be surprised if you pay more than $10,000.

Grillo Services, a landscaping supply company based in Connecticut, provides an estimate, along with a few pictures showing us how a pool is removed.  According to the website, you first want to determine how large your pool is in terms of cubic yards, and this can be done by measuring the length, width, and depth of your pool in feet.  Multiply this number and divide it by 27.  With this number, you can determine how much fill you would need from the company, who, according to the website, charges $12 per cubic yard.

Ann at annsentitledlife.com explained in her in-depth post that she was quoted $7,800 to fill in the pool and replace it with sod.

Pool demolition overview

Unfortunately, you’re unable to simply throw fill dirt into the pool and call it a day.  In order for the rainwater to drain properly, the shell needs to be removed to prevent it from becoming a muddy mess.  Also, if it isn’t removed properly, the pool can rise out of the ground as the earth exerts it, https://www.poolpricer.com/cost-of-removing-inground-pool/according to PoolPricer.com.

During the procedure, at a minimum, an excavator will come in and demolish the pool, breaking up the concrete/pool shell around and inside the pool.  This will involve using a jackhammer and punching holes within the shell to allow for proper drainage.  After the concrete is broken into pieces, it will be placed in a dumpster, usually located in the front driveway for future haul off.  Once the concrete has been removed, the area will be filled in with fill dirt, compacted and leveled out.  If you want to build something on top of the old pool, then the entire pool will need to be removed.

Partial pool removals will leave the pool intact.  Instead, the contractor will punch holes in the bottom of the pool and proceed to fill the pool up with dirt.  The top layer will be leveled, making it look as if no pool was ever there.

Depending on the contractor, some will also remove the decking around the pool, the fencing and even pool equipment.

What are the extra costs?

Some HOA or local city ordinances will require that you have a permit in order to have your pool filled.  Permits are going to vary from state to state.  Plan on spending anywhere from $50 or more in order to get the permits.

Many contractors will charge extra for jobs such as removing fences, concrete walkways or even decking that was built around the pool.  Before signing the contract, know what you’re for the price you’re paying.

Since the pool is going to leave a rather big imprint on your yard, there is a rather good chance that it will not flow with your yard at first.  Because of this, you are going to have to lay sod, dirt, and/or even landscaping in the area.  While this can be done yourself, professional landscapers can charge anywhere from $300 and up to re-landscape an area.  This cost will really depend on what you want to replace the area with.

Tips to know

In most cases, getting rid of a pool will more than likely affect your home’s value, unless the pool was in really bad shape.  Keep this in mind:  Not only will you spend $10,000 to remove a pool, you could lose that much in value as well, essentially doubling the cost of the removal.  Also, when removing a pool, you will have to disclose it to future home buyers when listing your home for sale.

How can I save money?

Consider buying a cover to keep the pool inactive year round.  While this won’t necessarily “close” the pool, it saves you from buying the costly chemicals every month.

With this big of a job, it’s best to get as many quotes as possible. If you don’t have the time or you don’t even know where to turn, consider getting multiple free quotes for free from HomeAdvisor.com.  Simply explain your job and licensed, reputable contractors will contact you with more information and quotes.

If you do decide to remove your pool, be sure to set aside the pool equipment and resell it online.


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