How Much Does Addyi Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 13, 2018

Addyi, a prescription-based drug commonly referred to as the “pink pill,” is used to help treat a low sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in women who have not gone through menopause, have a low sexual desire and/or a low sexual desire regardless of the sexual activity and is commonly prescribed for women who find their sexual desire to be troublesome and is not due to other medicines, mental health, problems in a relationship and/or drug abuse.

As per the drug information, this medicine is not available for women who have undergone menopause, for men or designed to help increase sexual performance.

How much does Addyi cost?

In general, from our research, health insurance providers will not cover this prescription if your doctor were to prescribe it, and for that reason, the costs will generally depend on the number of tablets prescribed and the pharmacy you choose, but for the most part, the average cost per 30 tablets of 100mg of Addyi tends to be in the $415 range, according to GoodRx.com.  This is the price if you were to not have adequate health insurance cover and you didn’t take advantage of any discounts the company offered.

The official website of Addyi had an advertisement on its website, claiming you could talk with a doctor over the phone for $75 and pay as little as $25 if your insurance company did not cover the drug or you were uninsured.  In the fine print, it did note that you will never pay more than $99 a month should your insurer not cover Addyi or you’re uninsured.  This is accurate as of 2018 and is subject to change.  Do read the fine print and the past link for more details.

In conclusion, it appears if you work with the drug manufacturer, your drug will probably be less than $99 a month; however, if you were to purchase directly without any health insurance or financial assistance, then the costs would be closer to the $415 a month range.

How to save on Addyi

Take advantage of the manufacturer’s discounted program:  The official manufacturer of the drug, Sprout Pharmaceuticals, does offer the Sprout Access Program, a program which helps you reduce your co-pay to as little as $25 on your first fill for those with health insurance or as little as $150 for cash paying patients.  To see if you qualify, you can follow this official link and fill out the questionnaire to see if you can save on your new prescription.  According to the fine print, it is only open to patients with commercial insurance and eligible uninsured patients and is not valid for anyone as part of a federal, state or a governmental program.

Larger supply:  A 90-day supply tends to be cheaper than a 30-day supply and if you know you will need the medicine for a longer-than-average time, then be sure to ask your doctor for a longer prescription to help save on the costs.  The drug, as per Rxeconsult.com, does note it will be discontinued if you see no change within eight weeks.

Coupons:  GoodRX.com, for example, works a lot like your health insurance policy.  To take advantage, all you need to do is find your local pharmacy, pick your dosage and print out the coupon to bring in to your local pharmacy to pay the price listed on the website.  If you were to use this option, however, do keep in mind that you will not be able to use your health insurance if they did cover the medication; it’s either this coupon or your health insurance, no mixing the two.

Risks and side effects

The drug, according to LifeHacker.com, can include sedation, dizziness and sleepiness, the main reason it should be taken right before bedtime.  The medication can also cause lower blood pressure and in rare circumstances, fainting.  According to regulators, though, this only happened to a select few during medical studies and users are likely to experience it while drinking alcohol.  Other side effects include somnolence, fatigue, dry mouth, anxiety, constipation, abdominal pain, rashes, vertigo and appendicitis.

Addyi reviews

With less than 10 reviews on Drugs.com, consumers gave the drug an average of a 4.4 out of 10, with some noting the drug made them very tired, almost like they were drunk, while another stated it started to work after the third week but only lasted a few days.  Others noted massive mood swings and felt it wasn’t worth it.

On EverydayHealth.com, three people gave the drug an average of 2.5 out of 5 stars, with two negative reviewers noting it was great as a sleeping pill and nothing else, while the lone five-star reviewer claimed it works just as described.

Lastly, on PeoplesPharmacy.com, 45 visitors gave the drug a 4.5 out of 5 stars, with the high majority said it truly works, while others noted you should be aware of the side effects once you stop the drug since it does affect your brain chemistry.

Tips to know

Dosages are often at bedtime, once a day, taken with a full glass of water.  If taken at any time other than your bedtime, then it can increase your chances of a lower blood pressure, accidental injury, daytime drowsiness, and/or fainting.  Never stop taking the medicine without doctor’s orders and be sure to take at regular intervals to reach the drug’s maximum efficiency.

As of today, a generic version of the drug or a drug similar to Addyi is not available on the market.

The drug was approved by the FDA in August of 2015.


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