How Much Does Apoquel Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 10, 2018

Apoquel from Zoetis offers rapid relief from itching (pruritus) for dogs that have allergic dermatitis.

Unlike common therapies, such as antihistamines, steroids, or cyclosporines, Apoquel is the only treatment that is specifically designed to go directly to the source of the itch. It is considered to be a great substitute to cortisone, which could have a number of side effects with long and short-term usage.

Apoquel is safe and has no contraindications. It comes in tablet form and works in as little as four hours, offering 24 hours of relief.

IMG_0694 by kmac989, on Flickr
IMG_0694” (CC BY 2.0) by kmac989

How much does Apoquel for dogs cost?

On average, Apoquel costs about $1.50 to $3 per tablet.  The cost will depend on the strength and where you buy it from.

At 1-800-PetMeds, for example, the price per tablet starts at $2.64.  A 3.6 mg tablet is $2.64, a 5.4 mg tablet is $2.76 and a 16 mg tablet is $2.89.  These are prices after the 15 percent coupon code is applied.

PetSmart starts at $2.50 per tablet, regardless of the dosage strength.

Apoquel overview

Apoquel tablets are available in three different strengths:  3.6, 5.4 and 16mg.  Each strength can cover a range of canine weights.  For the proper strength of tablets and the number of tablets to be administered, check the dosage label in the package leaflet.  The dose is 0.18 to 0.27 mg/lb of body weight, meaning the recommended initial dosage for a dog weighing 6.6 to 9.9 pounds is one half of a 3.6 mg tablet twice per day, for example.  Refer to our dosage chart below.

Apoquel (oclacitinib tablet) is a fast-acting anti-itch drug for used with canines. It’s manufactured by Zoetis, the world-renowned drug manufacturer.

What are the extra costs?

Apoquel can be used in combination with a majority of common therapies, including inoculations, antibiotics, NSAIDs and allergen immunotherapy. Allergy testing and allergy shots (immune-serum injections) are still a crucial option to consider when combating chronic, year-round allergies.

Tips to know

Apoquel is not an antihistamine, immune suppressant or a steroid in the sense that cyclosporine is. Apoquel has fewer effects on other immunity components to generalized infection. It uniquely targets cytokine signaling to control canine inflammation and itching regardless of the underlying cause.

You can administer Apoquel with or without food.

Apoquel is suited for dogs older than 12 months old, according to the drug manufacturer.  If younger than this, then it can increase the chances of developing a serious infection or may cause existing parasitic skin infections to get worse.

Common side effects include diarrhea and/or vomiting.

Since the medication works in such a narrow suppression range, other immune system components are less affected and retain the capacity to fight an infection and disease in the body. Apoquel can relieve the scratching and biting signs seen with allergies in 24 hours without the immune suppression of cyclosporine or the side effects of corticosteroids.

It has been found to be safe and effective in controlling acute (short-term or sudden onset) and chronic (long-term) itching for dogs. Oclacitinib, the active substance in Apoquel, is an immune-modulator — a drug that changes the activity of the immune system — which works by blocking the action of Janus kinases enzymes. These are enzymes that play a key role in the processes of itchiness and inflammation including those involved in atopic dermatitis and allergic dermatitis in canine. It is designed to specifically block pathways causing itching and inflammation with much less pronounced impact on general immune function. By blocking these enzymes, the drug reduces inflammation and itchiness associated with the diseases.

The Aapoquel generic is known as oclacitinib.  As of 2017, there is no over-the-counter substitute or generic version available.

Aapoquel dosage chart

How can I save money?

If purchasing from an online pharmacy, look for coupon codes as they are readily available.


Advertising Disclosure: This content may include referral links. Please read our disclosure policy for more info.

Null

Average Reported Cost: $62.74

100 %
0 %
Less Expensive $1 $1.5K $3K $5K $6.5K More Expensive $8k

How much did you spend?

Was it worth it?  

  1. Nolana. Animal Clinic (McAllen,  Texas) paid $65 and said:

    Where can we get this cheaper?

    Was it worth it? Yes

  2. Kim (Eagan,  Minnesota) paid $87 and said:

    $87 first month, 2 tablets twice daily and then 1 tablet daily. Price following month $67. Saved my poor dog from itchy himself to death.

    Was it worth it? Yes

  3. Hapy (Charlotte,  North Carolina) paid $2 and said:

    It works. $2/ea. for 16mg

    Was it worth it? Yes

  4. james leahy (vandling,  Pennsylvania) paid $48 and said:

    finch hill vet

    Was it worth it? Yes

  5. Cheryl Welch (Poughkeepsie,  New York) paid $59 and said:

    This drug has given my dog his life back. My dog has a lot more energy absolutely no itching scratching or licking of the paws. We have previously tried prednisones Benadryl Allegra which sedated most of the time. We just finished up our first month of two pills per day and now reducing it to one pill a day. A 30 day supply of 16 mg cost us $59 .

    Was it worth it? Yes

  6. Gail (Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania) paid $79 and said:

    $79.60 for 40 pills, 15 mg. That is $1.99 each with free shipping. At the vets in VA, the cost is about $2.25 per pill.

    Rosie is a Shar-Pei with typical allergies. These have given her back quality of life and hair. Well worth it. Since I’m on a fixed income it would be much better to get it lower priced if possible. I buy from Allivet.com

    Was it worth it? Yes

  7. Hartman Clinic (Conway,  Arkansas) paid $2 and said:

    I paid $1.90 per pill. 28 pills cost me $53.20. My dog just finished up 28 days at 2 pills per day.

    Was it worth it? Yes

  8. Neely (Nastrop,  Texas) paid $42 and said:

    We get 42 pills per refill.

    Was it worth it? Yes

  9. Suzanne (Naples,  Florida) paid $2.50 and said:

    Ordered via Allivet.

    Vet office $2.50/pill.

    Was it worth it? Yes

  10. Chris Posthumus (Burlington ,  Washington) paid $70 and said:

    Paid 70 dollars for a month supply and they do help some but not enough. I suppose they are worth it for the dog but 70 dollars is an awful amount considering it costs literally pennies per pill to make

    Was it worth it? Yes

  11. EVA CASH (Tacoma,  Washington) paid $139 and said:

    WE WENT THRU VET THE PIERCE COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY FUNDED MY PET UP TO 500.00 OF BILL WHEN I SAW AND THEY PAID WAS $139.00 ALSO. I WAS TOLD MY DOG HAS TO BE ON THIS FOR REST OF HER LIFE ..I CANNOT AFFORD THAT KINDA PRICE SO I AM SEEKING HELP IN GETTING HER MEDICATION FOR LESS . AS HER FUR FINALLY GROWING BACK AND SHE NO LONER TEARING SKIN TILL IT BLEEDS

    Was it worth it? Yes

  12. SM (Tallahassee,  Florida) paid $92 and said:

    I paid $92 for 42 3.5 mg tablets (Tallahassee, Florida). Tried it last March, also. It works very well and quickly. I just need a cheaper source or pet insurance with a drug benefit.

    Was it worth it? Yes

  13. Holly (Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania) paid $53 and said:

    54 pills 16mg.

    Was it worth it? Yes

  14. sharon (ocala,  Florida) paid $45 and said:

    45 dollars for 30 tablets

    Was it worth it? Yes

  15. Beth Snodgrass (ARLINGTON,  Texas) paid $105 and said:

    1-20 Animal Medical Clinic

    for 50 pills 5.4 mg

    Was it worth it? Yes

  16. Winston (San Jose,  California) paid $72 and said:

    VET – 30 pills, 16 mg…yes is helpful.. very pricey in CA looking for online alternatives

    Was it worth it? Yes

  17. B knight (FRESNO,  California) paid $104 and said:

    Works better than anything I have tried for her. But dosage is 2 per day. After 14 days 1 got her itching again. Was on cyclosporine and ketaconasol for years had stopped working.

    Was it worth it? Yes

About Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Amazon Affiliate Disclosure
Copyright © 2020 | Proudly affiliated with the T2 Web Network, LLC
The information contained on this website is intended as an educational aid only and is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.