How Much Does Cetrotide Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 13, 2018

Cetrotide, a prescription-based medication used to help women undergoing infertility treatment, is used to regulate hormone responses.  This injectable hormone is commonly used for IVF and sometimes in combination with other fertility-related drugs, such as Gonal-F, to help control ovulation to release the eggs when they mature.  Doctors will often prescribed this medication to help prevent premature ovulation for any women who are currently undergoing IVF treatments.

How much does Cetrotide cost?

At the time of this publishing, Cetrotide is only available as a brand name prescription, with no generic available.  Depending on your health insurance coverage and the pharmacy you choose, the cost of the medication tends to be in the $210 to $240 per 0.25mg vial without any insurance coverage in the United States.

As for health insurance, the results seem mixed, but for most, insurance coverage is almost non-existent, but it doesn’t mean you cannot save as we will explain below on a few ways you can save on your next prescription.  While it doesn’t hurt to talk with your insurance company, do not be surprised if your health insurance company denies coverage since many companies view infertility treatments as an optional treatment course of action, but in some states, according to IVFMeds.org, 15 states are currently required under law to offer coverage for infertility treatments.   GoodRX.com does note that all Medicare policies will not cover this drug.

How to save on Cetrotide

Manufacturer coupon:  The official manufacturer of the drug, EMD Serono, offers the Compassionate Care Program, a program which can help you save up to 75% off the cash price and will be based on your income provided.  To see if you qualify and how much you can save, you can do so by visiting FertilityLifelines.com.

Co-pay coupon:  Aside from the official manufacturer coupon, the company also offers a fertility co-pay card which can help you save up to $25, but this program, unlike the program mentioned prior, is available for commercially insured customers only.  To see if you qualify, you can visit the same website, FertilityLifelines.com.

Prescription coupons:  GoodRX.com and a slew of other prescription coupon-based websites can help you save more than 50% by simply downloading a coupon.  Available to anyone, regardless of your income and insurance, all you need to do is select the pharmacy you want to visit, the dosage and from there, you can print the coupon for free.  However, if you do go this route, keep in mind that you cannot use your commercial health insurance in conjunction with it.

Cetrotide overview

Cetrorelixis, a man-made hormone is designed to help blocks the effects of the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH), which is a hormone that controls another hormone known as the luteinizing hormone, a hormone that starts ovulation during the menstrual cycle.  In some cases, when women undergo hormone treatment, premature ovulation can occur, which can lead to the eggs that are ready to be fertilized to be released.  Cetrorelixis, the hormone mentioned prior, will help prevent this premature release.

The dosage will vary by patient, so it’s very important to follow your doctor’s directions, never taking more, less or stopping without your doctor’s consent.  The amount of medicine, depending on the strength, will often be three milligrams injected beneath the skin one time on the seventh day of your menstrual cycle or a 0.25-milligram injection beneath the skin on either day five or six of your menstrual cycle and continuing until the HCG administration starts.  Your doctor will always show you how to inject the medication and you can also reference the medication guide that comes along with the medication as well.  During your first injection, your doctor will monitor you for up to 30 minutes before sending you home for your subsequent injections.

Cetrotide side effects

Common side effects include swelling, redness or itching at the injection site, headaches, nausea or mild to moderate overstimulation of the ovaries. Rare but more serious side effects may include abdominal pain, bloating, vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, difficulty breathing and/or a decrease in urine.  If you experience any unwanted side effects, consult with a medical professional immediately.  To reference more side effects, refer to this FDA guide.


Advertising Disclosure: This content may include referral links. Please read our disclosure policy for more info.

Null

Average Reported Cost: $0

0 %
0 %
Less Expensive $1 $1.5K $3K $5K $6.5K More Expensive $8k

How much did you spend?

Was it worth it?  

About Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Amazon Affiliate Disclosure
Copyright © 2020 | Proudly affiliated with the T2 Web Network, LLC
The information contained on this website is intended as an educational aid only and is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.