How Much Does ELISA Test Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 8, 2018

The ELISA test, known as an Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, can determine if an antigen is present in a sample.

This test will use components of the immune system and chemicals to detect any immune responses in the body and will involve an enzyme and an antibody or antigen to help commonly diagnose infections such as HIV, lyme disease, hemolytic anemia, RMSF, rotavirus, syphilis, toxoplasmosis and some allergic diseases.

The substances detected during the reading may include viral antigens, hormones, bacterial antigens and/or antibodies the body created in order to start fighting an infection or vaccination.

How much does an ELISA test cost?

The cost of an ELISA test will depend on how you’re taking it, what you’re testing for and where you live.  If you were to order a kit from an online laboratory, the costs can be anywhere from $150 to $600 per test.

Members on MD Junction talked about this question, and one member, in particular, said they were quoted $350 for the ELISA and another $140 for the Western Blot.  Another member said they paid $225 at a local lab and another $260 for the Western Blot.

ELISA test overview

A kit, if purchased online, will include a pre-coated polystyrene plate, detection antibodies and the chemicals needed to perform the tests; however, if you want to use the test for a specific disease, then the kit will only include the substances designated, according to Medicine Net.  In most cases, a lab tech will need to take a blood sample, but in some circumstances, they can take urine or saliva.  At most testing sites, if you have the test done in person, can take up to four hours; however, if you were to send the results to a lab online, then the results could take up to two weeks to deliver.

There are four types and hundreds of variations of ELISA tests:  direct, indirect, sandwich and competitive.  In general, an ELISA test will be accurate and are considered highly sensitive and compares favorably with other methods to detect certain substances in the body.  This will often be the first step to determine if other in-depth tests are required.

Depending on the results being tested, you could see results in as little as 24 hours if testing at a local lab.

What are the extra costs?

If testing for HIV, the test will always have to be done with a Western Blot or IFA if you tested positive for HIV on your ELISA tests, and labs will almost always combine this test so you don’t have to take two blood samples at once.  The Western Blot will confirm the ELISA test findings if you were to test positive for an HIV infection within the last six months.  This test, effectively, will confirm HIV antibodies were present.  As mentioned in our bullet point above, a Western Blot test, if needed, will be an additional $200 to $300 at most local labs.

As stated, an ELISA test is only the first test.  If you were to test positive for any test, other tests would be mandatory to determine the right course of action.

Tips to know:

In general, a doctor won’t ask for any special prep work.  Commonly done in a lab, if blood were required, it would be no different than any other test that draws your blood.

Side effects, according to HealthLine.com, may include an infection, feeling faint, bruising or more bleeding than usual.

How can I save money?

Those who have had this test done in the past highly recommend getting it done at a local laboratory, not the hospital lab as the prices can be two to three times higher.


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