How Much Does Harvoni Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 13, 2018

Harvoni, manufactured by Gilead Sciences, is two antiviral medicines in one tablet, used to treat hepatitis C but will not work on other viral infections such as the cold or flu.

How much does Harvoni cost?

The costs of Harvoni, only available as a brand name prescription at the time of this publishing, will depend on your health insurance coverage, the quantity and the pharmacy you choose.  From the research we gathered, the costs of Harvoni, based on these factors, could range anywhere from as little as $16,000 for 14 tablets to as much as $62,000 for 56 tablets without any health insurance coverage.

Quantity (per 90mg/400mg tablet)Price Reported (without insurance)
14$16,000
21$24,000
30$35,000
56$63,000

As for health insurance coverage, the results seemed mixed, with only a select few policies, including up to 77% of Medicare Advantage plans and Part D, covering the prescription.  According to this GoodRX.com study, Express Scripts and Caremark, companies which handle pharmacy benefits for more than 200 million Americans, decided to drop this medication in 2016, but it doesn’t mean your health insurance policy will cover it and/or there are other ways to save on this medication aside from your health insurance policy.  To know for certain if your policy will cover this drug, either contact your health insurance company directly or search your health insurance company’s drug directory online to see your restrictions and if you’re covered.  Even with insurance, co-pays were reported to be in the $6,700 to $27,000 range.

The Pharmacy Times noted the dug could cost close to $94,500 for a 12-week regimen, making it one of the most expensive hepatitis C treatment options.

How to save on Harvoni

The official manufacturer coupon:  The official manufacturer of the drug, Gilead, offers a Harvoni Co-Pay Coupon, a coupon which allows you to pay as little as $5 per fill, with a savings of 25% off the catalog price as long as you meet the restrictions, which according to the restrictions, you can not be part of a government health care prescription program, such as Medicare, nor can you apply if your commercial insurance plan reimburses you the entire cost.  To learn more, follow the official link and fill out the questionnaire to see if you qualify for the co-pay coupon to help you save.

Patient assistance program:  Aside from the co-pay coupon, Gilead also offers the patient assistance program, My Support Path, a program which can help you receive your medication at no cost as long as you do not have insurance and a limited income.  To qualify, you will need to prove your household income and you will need a valid prescription from your doctor, and to apply, the company asks that you either ask your doctor to help you fill out an application or you can do so via the official website.

Hepatitis C Fund:  Aside from the official patient assistance program mentioned prior, many non-profits exist, such as the Hepatitis C Fund, that can help pay for your medication as long as you qualify.  These programs, similar to the rest, will often need a proof of household income and a valid prescription in order to qualify.  To see if you qualify for the Hepatitis C Fund, follow this link to find out more information.

Even more patient assistance programs:  Aside from the typical federal and state assistance programs, there are plenty of non-profit organizations out there that want to help you with specific medications, including Harvoni.  The Good Days Patient Assistance Program and PAN Foundation, for example, both offer assistance for this particular drug for patients who meet qualification requirements.  For the Good Days Patient Assistance Program, for instance, patients will have to have insurance, a valid prescription and must be diagnosed for a specific disease to qualify, whereas the PAN Foundation asks for the same requirements as well but may offer different financial assistance in the long run.  If you think you qualify, be sure to fill out as many of these forms as possible to see if you can receive financial assistance.

Additional resources:  This LifeBeyondHepatitisC.com article does a great job showing you the multiple resources, aside from the ones mentioned above, that you can take advantage of to help you save on your next prescription.

Harvoni overview

Harvoni will be taken with a full glass of water, either with or without food, according to the medication guide.  Always follow the directions as per the prescription label and always follow your doctor’s orders, never taking more, less or even stopping without your doctor’s consent.  For most, it will be taken as a single pill, once daily for up to 24 weeks total, however, some may be considered for eight to 12 weeks of treatment depending on their circumstances such as past treatments, your viral genotype and past medical history.

How does Harvoni work?

Hepatitis C is a disease of the liver which is caused by a virus known to have six different strains, also referred to as genotypes.  Harvoni, a direct-acting antiviral (DAA), are a group of medications which were designed to help block the ability of this virus to make copies of itself.  A combination of two DAAs, one being sofosbuvir, a nucleotide polymerase inhibitor, and the other, ledipasvir, sofosbuvir will interfere with the virus genetic material, stopping production, while ledipasvir will additionally interfere with the protein required to complete the Hep C virus life cycle in the level cell.  While the drug can help cure the disease, a person can get infected again.

Harvoni side effects

Side effects reported, although it is not a full list, includes feeling ill in general, light-colored stools, unusual weaknesses, yellowing of the eyes/skin, diarrhea, headaches, nausea, feeling tired and/or trouble sleeping.  As with any prescription medication, if you feel any of these side effects, contact your doctor for medical help immediately.  For a full list of side effects, refer to this FDA guide.

Tips to know

The cure rate ranges anywhere from 94 to 99 percent, according to HepMag.com.


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