How Much Does Magic Mouthwash Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 30, 2018

Mixed medication mouthwash, oftentimes referred to as “magic mouthwash,” as per the American Academy of Nursing, is commonly used to help prevent or even treat oral mucositis, but it can also help relieve canker sores and even a sore throat.

Usually compounded by a pharmacy, often containing anticholinergic agents, such as diphenhydramine, and an anesthetic, such viscous lidocaine, as well as an antacid or muscosal coating agent, this mouthwash is usually prescribed by your dentist.

While it may provide some relief for some, Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. notes that it’s unclear how effective it is.

Magic Mouthwash Cost
Pouring Mouthwash” (CC BY-SA 2.0) by colink.

How much does a magic mouthwash prescription cost?

The costs of magic mouthwash will depend on a few factors, including the brand and the pharmacy you use (if prescribed).  According to our research,  the costs of an eight-ounce bottle tends to be in the $35 to $65 range.

Since magic mouthwash isn’t considered a prescription drug, rather a combination of various medicines, your insurance coverage may cover it depending on your policy restrictions.  Some drugs may be covered, but to be certain, talk with your insurance company and local pharmacy to know what you may be responsible for.

On this Cancer.org forum thread, for example, one member paid $69, but after insurance, it was reduced to $2, while another member on this same forum thread said she paid $79 for her prescription.

Someone on CancerCompass.com said he was quoted $60 a bottle with a script, while another on this same thread said he only paid $30.

Non-prescribed mouthwash, however, which tries to mimic the effects of a prescribed mouthwash, often ranges anywhere from $11 to $22 per eight-ounce bottle and will depend on where you purchase it and which brand you consider.  Do keep in mind, however, that a non-prescribed mouthwash will not have the active ingredients a prescribed mouthwash has, simply meaning it may not work for your ailment/condition.

The American Academy of Nursing, cited above, performed a study, exploring the costs of varying magic mouthwash brands on the market and found the average eight-ounce compounding kit could cost anywhere from $34 to $50.  When used four to six times a day, the common prescription for this type of mouthwash, this prescription would only last two days or less, meaning you should be prepared to budget about $17 a day to use the mouthwash.

Magic mouthwash overview

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are several versions of magic mouthwash on the market, with some available in a pre-measured kit that’s mixed by a pharmacist, while others are “prepared to order” via a pharmacist.  In any case, if your doctor or dentist determines magic mouthwash is best for your situation, then he or she will write a prescription, and it will be similar to that of any other mouthwash coming in a liquid form.

Most prescriptions are intended to be used every four to six hours, and like over-the-counter mouthwash, it should be held in your mouth for about one to two minutes.  You should also avoid eating or drinking anything at least 30 minutes prior to taking the mouthwash to make sure it takes full effect.  As all magic mouthwash brands can vary, be sure to read the label closely for more information as to how to use it properly as well as talk with your doctor for more information.

Ingredients

Regardless of which type you choose, it should contain at least three of the following ingredients:

Magic mouthwash side effects


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