How Much Does miraDry Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 13, 2018

miraDry is an FDA cleared and non-invasive treatment designed to help with excessive underarm sweating by using microwave energy to destroy sweat glands for good.

How much does miraDry cost?

The cost of miraDry greatly depends on the provider you use, your geographical location and how the office charges as some have setup packages with a flat price, whereas other offices may simply charge per session.  Regardless, from the costs we researched online, one session averages about $1,700 to $2,000, whereas a second treatment session, if needed, would be about half this, about $800 to $1,000.  In total, most people paid anywhere from $1,800 to $3,100 to see desirable results.

Since miraDry is considered to be a cosmetic procedure, your health insurance provider will not cover the procedure, even if you have a hyperhidrosis diagnosis.  However, as all policies greatly vary, check with your provider to know your limitations just to make sure.

According to Shareef Jandali, M.D. on this Realself.com Q&A thread, for example, claimed his practice would charge $1,800 for the first treatment and another $950 for the second treatment.  He also noted that most patients would only require one treatment to see the results they desire and the costs, even though they seem expensive at first, could pay off quite a bit in the future since the results are permanent.  Another doctor on this same thread stated only 20% of her patients needed a second treatment and her first treatment at her office would cost $1,950, with any subsequent treatments billed at $975 each.

The procedure

On the day of your treatment, like most cosmetic laser-based procedures, you will first be asked to sign a consent form and change into a gown.

Before the treatment begins, your nurse will first apply a numbing cream to the underarms to help minimize the discomfort, followed by multiple numbing shots about 30 minutes later, which is administered with a black marker via a specialized stencil that “fits” your underarm area to determine how many you need for the treatment.   Katie Chang, who described her experience, stated she received about two passes of 20 odd shots of lidocaine for each underarm or about 80 shots in total and was even told her area was “very small.”  Even though she stated her threshold for discomfort was high, she had to ask her nurse to stop several times to collect herself.

After the lidocaine injections complete, the miraDry quickly follows while you lay face up with your arms folded behind your head to help expose your underarms.  As the machine’s handpiece is pressed against the underarms, one pulse per placement site, lasting about 30 seconds each, allows light suction to help secure the small areas of the skin where the microwave heat is channeled to destroy the underarm sweat glands.  Each underarm, after the lidocaine injections complete, takes about 20 to 30 minutes per underarm or about one hour in total.

The total procedure, from start to finishes, averages close to two to two and a half hours.  Camille Harris on Bellatory.com talked about the procedure as well.

Aftercare

After, your underarms will be quite red and swollen and may feel as if there are golf balls in your underarms.  Your doctor will provide you with an aftercare sheet, noting that you should apply ice under each arm for the next 24 hours, along with 800 milligrams of ibuprofen every eight hours for the next day.  For most patients, after the 24 hours conclude, the underarms may still be puffy but the swelling generally resolves quickly and the sweating is noticeably reduced in a few weeks after the treatment completes.

miraDry side effects

Tips to know

Botox, another treatment considered for sweaty armpits, is quite different than miraDry since Botox will temporarily block the sweat glands for up to six months, whereas miraDry, as mentioned, will destroy the sweat glands for good.

miraDry is highly recommended for those with axillary hyperhidrosis, and according to Dr. Jennifer MacGregor, via this Bloomberg.com article, it’s when the sweating rules, not just affects, your life.  If you feel no prescription antiperspirants do not work and you’re changing shirts constantly due to the sogginess, then you may be an ideal candidate.  Talk with a dermatologist in your area who uses the technology to see if it could work for your situation.


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Average Reported Cost: $2266.67

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Less Expensive $1 $1.5K $3K $5K $6.5K More Expensive $8k

How much did you spend?

Was it worth it?  

  1. Kennedy (Scottsdale,  Arizona) paid $2150 and said:

    I just had my first miraDry treatment and my doctor suggested another treatment a few month later, hence the 2150 charge. The procedure was “annoying” to say the least and the swelling did last for a few weeks BUT after about 3 weeks I was back to normal and the deodorant use has gone down 95% at least. I am so happy to say the least!!

    Was it worth it? Yes

  2. Elise (Minneapolis,  Minnesota) paid $3100 and said:

    I have read a lot of positive review and suffering from Hyperhidrosis since I was young. I did need two treatments and the lidocaine pricks/shots are the WORST. I tolerate a lot of pain but this was at least a 7/10 for me… the laser was nothing. I have noticed the sweating go down a little but my armpits were severely red for weeks after.

    Was it worth it? Yes

  3. Kali (San Diego,  California) paid $1550 and said:

    The first treatment seemed to work great but I do sweat a bit less than I use to — not sure if placebo effect, lol. It took a week for the pain to subside but other than that, I would recommend it if you sweat excessively!

    Was it worth it? Yes

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