How Much Does a Japanese Maple Tree Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 14, 2018

The Japanese Maple could be the most desirable garden tree.

With a variety of tree shapes, forms and colors, it’s bound to turn heads during the fall months when the leaves change into red or green colors.

Red by ai3310X, on Flickr
Red” (CC BY 2.0) by  ai3310X

How much does a Japanese Maple tree cost?

The cost of a Japanese Maple will depend on the exact variety, its size and where you purchase it from.  As you can see in our table below, the costs can range from as little as $25 for a one-gallon container to as much as $1,000+ for an eight-foot tree.  With upwards of 330 cultivars of this species and various price points, refer to our table below to see what it may cost:

VarietyAverage Price
Aratama Japanese Maple- $90 for 2-gallon tree
Bloodgood Japanese Maple- $40 for 3-gallon
- $85 for 2-3 foot tree
- $105 for 3-4 foot tree
- $400 for 6-foot tree
- $700 for 8-foot tree
- $1,100 for 10-foot tree
Bonfire Japanese Maple- $90 for 2-gallon tree
Boskoop Glory Japanese Maple- $90 for 2-gallon tree
Burgandy Lace Japanese Maple- $60 for 4-foot tree
- $125 for 6-foot tree
- $750 for 9-foot tree
Butterfly Japanese Maple- $75 for 2-3 foot tree
- $95 for 3-4 foot tree
Coral Bark Japanese Maple- $75 for 2-3 foot tree
- $95 for 3-4 foot tree
- $125 for 4-5 foot tree
- $600 for 8-foot tree
Crimson Queen Japanese Maple- $30 for 1-2 foot tree
- $80 for 2-3 foot tree
- $140 for 4-5 foot tree
Ed Wood Full Moon Japanese Maple- $70 for 2-3 foot tree
- $100 for 3-4 foot tree
Emperor Japanese Maple- $85 for 2-3 foot tree
- $100 for 3-4 foot tree
Ever Red Japanese Maple- $40 for 3-gallon tree
Fireglow Japanese Maple- $200 for 7-foot tree
Garnet Japanese Maple- $40 for 3-gallon tree
Green Cascade Japanese Maple- $90 for 2-gallon tree
Kiyohime Japanese Maple- $100 for 2-3 foot tree
Koto No Ito Japanese Maple- $90 for 2-3 foot tree
Lace Leaf Japanese Maple- $85 for 5-gallon tree
Lion’s Head Japanese Maple- $40 for 1-gallon
- $80 for 2-3 foot tree
- $100 for 3-4 foot tree
Mikawa Yatsubusa Japanese Maple- $90 for 1-2 foot tree
Moonfire Japanese Maple- $150 for 5-gallon tree
Orangeola Japanese Maple- $80 for 2-3 foot tree
Osakazuki Japanese Maple- $115 for 3-4 foot tree
Purple Ghost Japanese Maple- $150 for 3-4 foot tree
Red Japanese Maple- $25 for 1-gallon
Red Select Japanese Maple- $40 for 3-gallon tree
Ryusen Japanese Maple- $80 for 3-4 foot tree
Seiryu Japanese Maple- $80 for 4-5 foot tree
Shaina Japanese Maple- $80 for 3-gallon tree
Sherwood Flame Japanese Maple- $50 for 1-gallon tree
Shishigashira Lions Head Japanese Maple- $40 for 1-gallon tree
- $80 for 2-3 foot tree
- $100 for 3-4 foot tree
Shishigashira Lions Head Japanese Maple- $40 for 1-gallon
- $80 for 2-3 foot tree
- $100 for 3-4 foot tree
Tamukeyama Japanese Maple- $85 for 2-3 foot tree
Viridis Japanese Maple- $40 for 3-gallon tree

At Lowe’s, for example, a 3.25-gallon red Japanese Maple tree retails for a pinch more than $20.

On Amazon.com, a few highly rated trees range from $30 for a one to two foot tall Japanese Red Maple to $35+ for a floating cloud Japanese Maple.

Japanese Maple seeds, depending on the variety, are often $2 to $4 per 20 pack.




Japanese Maple tree overview

With more than one thousand different varieties, most are quite similar, while rarer species can be appealing to collectors.  The major areas of differences will include the leaf form, which can range from a larger-than-average leaf to a smaller leaf divided in sizes; the leaf color; branch arrangement, where some may be upright, similar to a regular tree, while others have horizontal branches, creating a lower sitting tree; and the overall size, ranging from as tall as 25 feet to as little as a shrub, only a few feet tall.

Depending on the variety, some can grow into in a small tree, similar to that of a shrub, or as tall as 20 feet.  They may be cascading, upright or pendulous in form, with most varieties producing a green or red leaf during the fall and a wide variety of colors during the spring.

They can be grown inside of a container when small, in a garden or just like any other tree in your yard.  Compared with other trees, they tend to have fewer pests and diseases, making them a versatile choice.

What are the extra costs?

If planting on your own, it’s essential to prep the soil before planting to ensure it grows at a healthy rate.  Whatever soil you may be using, always make sure you’re using a generous amount of organic material such as a garden compost or manure at three inches thick to encourage root growth.  If you want to plant inside of a container, then be sure enough drainage holes exist to stop the flooding from killing the trees as overwatering can do damage.  Every month, after the tree has been planted, it should be fed with a liquid fertilizer.  Japanese Maples require afternoon shade, especially when young, protection from stronger winds, well-drained soild and protection from frost, according to Wayside Gardens.

Many nurseries may charge a delivery fee, especially if you don’t meet the spending minimum.  Delivery charges commonly start at $50 and increase from there, depending on the distance traveled.

If you need a landscaper to plant the tree, the average job could cost $50 to $100 per tree, but it can drop “per tree” if more than one tree needs to be planted.  If you did want to hire a landscaper to plant a tree for you, consider getting multiple quotes for free from HomeAdvisor.com.

Tips to know:

Depending on the variety, most Japanese Maple trees will work best in cooler areas with minimal afternoon soon.  Refer to the care guide to know exactly which environment the tree will thrive in.

Most Japanese Maple trees won’t need to be staked unless it’s a cascading form.

The autumn months, at least one month before the first frost, will be the best time to plant your Japanese Maple to encourage root growth.


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