How Much Does the Perfect Workout™ Cost?


Written by:  Howmuchisit.org Staff
Last Updated:  August 10, 2018

The Perfect Workout™, according to its official website, uses expert personal trainers who specialize in a different slow-motion strength training program.  This program, in turn, offers you a firmer, stronger and more shapely body from just two 20-minute training sessions a week.

Perfect Workout™ Cost
Weight Rack” (CC BY 2.0) by davco9200

How much does the Perfect Workout™ cost per session?

From our research, the costs, depending on the gym you attend, will average $40 to $75~ per private session, but as with most exercise packages, this price can decrease slightly if you were to purchase sessions in bulk.

For example, on WhereCanIFindthePerfect.com, the price at the Inform Fitness location was $125 per session, with a decrease in price if you purchased packages of six, 12 or 24.  A six-session package, for example, would cost $570.

According to one reviewer for the Walnut Creek Perfect Workout location on Yelp, she claimed to have paid $60 for 20 minutes.

On the club’s FAQ page, while they do not note the exact costs, they do mention the costs are half of that of what a personal trainer would charge in the areas the gyms are located.

How does it work?

These 20-minute workouts, tailored to keep you in shape, will use high intensity-like strength training, which is performed in slow motion at any of the gym locations listed here.  This method, if done effectively, is known to be more beneficial than going to the cardio machines multiple times throughout the week.  During the routine, it pushes you to utilize 100 percent of each targeted muscle, allowing you to work out once a week, allowing you to unwind and recuperate.

From what we researched, the trainer will first lead you to a range of exercises which will target every muscle in the body.  Using specialized machines, weights will be set higher than average in order to strongly contract your muscles until they are no longer able to lift.  Each repetition, as you repeat it, will essentially require you to use more muscle and less momentum, placing lighter pressure on your joints as you’re not doing as many repetitions like most exercises ask for.

When your session comes to an end, you will receive a full body workout, which some claim can bring you to tears.

The average person will attend two 30-minute sessions twice a week, usually at a local approved gym location.

Studies have shown that the special slow-motion strength training can produce 50 percent more improvement than regular weight training — and it only takes 20 minutes per session, twice a week.

When do you see results?

According to the company, most people should see a change within six weeks, but the speed and the results can depend on many factors, including how the body responds to the exercises and how effective your nutrition is.

Ideal for those who…

are new to strength training and want to learn how to exercise effectively and safely.

want a private workout environment using state-of-the-art equipment.

do not want to spend additional time at the gym beyond what is necessary.

The Perfect Workout™ reviews

Almost all of the reviews we found online were from Yelp, with almost all of the locations in the United States averaging a 4.5 star or better.  Several of the reviews we looked at stated it’s a great way to work out the body in a fast-paced environment, while others truly believed they were able to maximize their results when compared to the traditional gym routine.


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